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Visual Storytelling, Emojis Connect with Malaysian Millennials

Visual storytelling will become increasingly important for Malaysian marketers as millennials lean toward social networks that showcase image-heavy content

Visual storytelling will become increasingly important for Malaysian marketers as millennials lean toward social networks that showcase image-heavy content

Are emojis their own language? We certainly use them like they are.

The Swiftkey Emoji Report analyzed data from users of its popular Keyboard app in 16 different languages and regions within a four-month period. This lent itself to some headline-making insights such as “Canada Loves the poop emoji,” “America leads the world in cake and meat emoji,” and “Report Shows Australia is ‘the land of vice and indulgence’.”

Malaysia dominated a good number of the categories — Funny emojis, thumbs up, sleepy face, farm animals — making that country the “most emoji saavy” with the Top 10 emoji making up 37 percent of all emoji used. While the report is certainly not to be taken entirely seriously, it’s fun to think about how visual storytelling is becoming increasingly important in this day and age.

visual-storytelling-malaysian-millennials

Blogging was really popular in Malaysia around 2010, where there was around 2 million bloggers. In 2014, it was revealed that there was 3.5 million Twitter users. For a population of 30.29 million with a broadband penetration rate of 70.2 percent per 100 households in Q4 2014, this is amounts to a rather significant 10 percent.

Of course, we do not have the exact year or date when Twitter became popular in Malaysia, or how many of those users mentioned are active. However, it is clear that Twitter is rapidly gaining in popularity over blogging just by sheer number of users. In other parts of Asia, platforms such as WeChat are also starting to blur the line between blogs and social networking sites, making it even more important to consider the role of shorter and more concise forms of visual storytelling.

While blogs and long-form articles have their merits — because articles can be presented through searchable databases with proper archiving — we need to also consider how information is presented to meet the attention demands of a 140-character world.

When working with online and social media content for brands, look for opportunities to produce visual storytelling assets that present information in bite-sized chunks. This can be in the form of branded images, micrographics, memes or even graphs and charts — all of which are highly shareable and far easier to immediately understand than a big block of text.

In order to increase their sharing power, visual storytelling should be short, sweet and able to tell the story with one glance. Visual storytelling should also try to evoke emotions such as happiness, sadness and nostalgia. Ideally, your visual storytelling should fit the platform used; for example, square photos work well in Instagram and Facebook timelines.

In short, visual storytelling is one of the best ways to communicate information and depth in an increasingly attention-deficit world.

 

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