Content amplification trends to watch

As more outlets become available for content amplification, marketers are faced with a wealth of choices. What are the trends to watch? We’ve outlined the biggest ones below.

As more outlets become available for content amplification, marketers are faced with a wealth of choices. What are the trends to watch? We’ve outlined the biggest ones below.

The past couple of years have seen some very rapid growth in outlets available for content amplification. Marketers are faced with an array of different options, each with their own pros and cons, and none of which can guarantee success. Based on the work that we’ve carried out for clients at Text100, here are a few things to look out for in the content amplification arena.

Attribution

Everybody wants to know what’s working! Attribution is the process of identifying marketing touchpoints and then assigning values to them. Much of its success depends on tracking and tagging being done properly. Fortunately, people are getting more comfortable with appending links and URLs with appropriate tags, but usage is not quite universal yet.

Once it is, and marketers and agencies are sufficiently well-versed in using platforms such as Omniture and Google Analytics, a much clearer picture of which channels are performing will appear. Those who are ready to embrace flexible budgets will see value in being able to base their dollar allocation on factual decisions, rather than assumptions.

Multi-channel budgeting

As online media buying becomes more sophisticated, clients (and some vendors, too) will be more open to keeping a pooled budget that is shared across multiple platforms. For vendors, this will mean that purchase orders may need to be a thing of the past, as clients will need to commit to the pool, rather than the platform.

As such, self-service models will be more important as marketers change their mix to prioritize the best performing markets and channels. We may see more clients considering open ended budgets, too — spending against a cost per acquisition, rather than limiting their potential with a set budget.

Better targeting

This probably isn’t so much of a trend, but more an ongoing necessity. Amplification of content on any platform is essentially advertising, and as such, the audience will still view it with some scepticism. That’s fine, but the challenge that marketers face is delivering an ad to a person who is actually interested in (or at least doesn’t mind) seeing it.

Many of the people up in arms about ad blockers are missing the point – while ads are a fact of life, they shouldn’t destroy people’s experiences to the extent that they feel the need to block them. Identifying the audience isn’t enough; marketers need to validate the audience by their intent. Carving out a portion of the universe by age, gender, job titles, and interests will always have a place, but we’d be better off if advertisers go a step further and look for those audiences who are interested in the content being shared with them.

These three areas of content amplification will see more emphasis in the immediate future. A campaign that includes all three elements stands an excellent chance of being a success!

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