The art of snackable storytelling

Short-form ‘snackable’ content may seem limiting, but do it right and it’s a great way to connect with your audience. We offer some tips on doing just that.

Short-form ‘snackable’ content may seem limiting, but do it right and it’s a great way to connect with your audience. We offer some tips on doing just that.

By now you’re well aware of how much happens in an internet minute.

Audience attention spans are now shorter than ever, thanks to social media and a massive uptick in mobile-first browsing.

Telling stories in tweets, 10-second videos and clever gifs is a fantastic opportunity to let your creativity shine through.

Challenge accepted

Snackable content forces marketers to strip a story right down to its essence: absolutely no fuzz.

When done right, you can use this to connect with your audience far more powerfully than with long-form content.

Here’s a few tips to help you create shareable, snackable content:

Don’t cut corners

Producing bite-sized content doesn’t mean serving up a half-baked strategy or slapdash production quality. Today’s audiences are super-savvy and will not be bamboozled by clickbait that leads to sub-par content.

If you want to build a credible brand, take the time to develop a solid strategy informed by audience insights. Great snackable content can hold its own as a standalone asset, but also ladders up to a bigger brand story.

Check out Red Bull’s winning entries for the Snackable Content Awards’ Beverage Branded Content of the Year. Despite being short in length, each video shows high production value and projects Red Bull’s overall brand image.

Answer questions

Campaigns built on snackable content should deal with the reasons your target audience is searching and scrolling on their smartphones to begin with. These are micro-moments, and there are four types:

  • I want to know
  • I want to go
  • I want to do
  • I want to buy

Content that involves these micro-moments in a creative manner is more likely to get your audience doing something. They want accurate information quickly, and as marketers it’s our job to make that journey as smooth as possible.

Finally, have fun

Having to tell stories within parameters should not, by any means, feel limiting. In fact, the cleverest marketers use these to their advantage. For example, the popular Netflix show Orange Is The New Black. To promote the 4th season, “Tap that Glass” featured characters performing as if they were trapped inside your phone. The campaign created huge spikes in engagement compared to simple clips from the series, and won a Shorty Award as a result.

Ready to start producing snackable content? We’ll help you get started.

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